futureappletree studio 2

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stringless yo yo music © 2012

DOG BONES, LITTLE BOY PRIDE...



We got a couple Lathes...Presto 8n, 6n from the 40s/50s.  There's going to be a learning curve, but it will be cool to cut records.  They will be mono at first, and mostly polycarbonate/plexi.  We'll offer one off "lathe cuts" and limited runs. 

Some modern recordings in rotation: Landlady, Chocolat, Wild Beasts, Jesca Hoop, Kieth Mead, Andy Shauf.



Headphones are seldom used for Daytrotter sessions at FAT2, and sometimes not for multitrack recording.  They don't seem to help performance, and they disconnect the musician from the sonic environment.  Also, it seems when a singer struggles a bit to hear, they sing a little better...most of the time.  There's something to it. 

Limitation is your friend. Limitation is the most important imposition on the recording process.  Learning and choosing to "deal with it".  Knowing that flexibility is not necessarily helpful.  More choices does not equal a better recording.  Because you can make more choices, should you?  Why not just decide to have fewer.  When making a choice, just make it and move on.  Maybe another choice would sound "better".  So what. You'll never know.  Why bother thinking about it?

There is a continuum from thought or inspiration to end product where the music goes from abstract to concrete.  During that process, the ideas mingle with the "real world" via guitars, keyboards, compressors, reverbs, speakers, tape, etc. etc.  The mingling is of unseen "thought" electric brain activity to unseen "real world" electrical/acoustic activity...amplification/sound/vibration/recording.  The lyrics have meaning, and take different paths toward the concrete in this process usually, as well.  Being conscious of this process, and sometimes unconscious, is important.  Analyze the micro/macro aspects of the work.  The end user will first perceive it "as one" and only later discover its parts if they like what they hear. 



There is nothing to gain from volume of sound past a certain point.  Similar to an overexposed photo, detail and definition is reduced as volume goes up.  In a recording, apparent volume and actual volume are not the same, that is, you can make a quiet thing sound loud in a recording.  Obviously, sometimes an amp needs to be a certain volume to sound a certain way, and that makes sense, but in a room with several other people making noise it isn't helpful. 


Know when it's done, or good enough.  Walk away.